Roweboat

Relentlessy optimistic.

wired:

The Arthur Kill ship graveyard was never meant to become such a decrepit spectacle. In the years following World War II, the adjacent scrapyard began to purchase scores of outdated vessels, with the intention of harvesting them for anything of value. But the shipbreakers couldn’t keep pace with the influx of boats, especially once people started to use the graveyard as a dumping ground for their old dinghies. Plenty of ships fell into such disrepair that they were no longer worth the effort to strip, especially since many teem with toxic substances. And so they’ve been left to rot in the murky tidal strait that divides Staten Island from New Jersey, where they’ve turned scarlet with rust and now host entire ecosystems of hardy aquatic creatures.

MORE: The Secret NYC Graveyard Where Ships Go to Die

“Literature should not be suppressed merely because it affects the moral code of the censor.”

– William Orville Douglas. (via quotedojo)

“There are no metrics for how quickly a group should recover from legally enforced subordination, and no statistical rendering of ongoing racial inequalities could match the explanatory power of a ‘Colored Only’ sign.”

Jelani Cobb on the legacy of Brown v. Board of Education: http://nyr.kr/1nRrHc8 (via newyorker)

“Eat a live toad the first thing in the morning and nothing worse will happen to you the rest of the day.”

– Unknown. (via quotedojo)

godtiering:

give me a character (from anything ever) in my ask and I’ll rate: somewhat attractive | eh | not really my type | pretty | handsome | beautiful | stud | gorgeous | SWEET LORD MERCY

can you relate to this character on a personal level?: no | not really | somewhat | yes | they are me

would you date/be friends with this character in real life if they were real?: total bros | friends | best friends | date | become their steady boyfriend/ girlfriend | neither | i don’t know

newsweek:

The summer before I went to university in Dublin, I was in a state of high anxiety – not about the prospect of leaving home or the coming course work so much as my ability to drink alcohol in any quantity. 

To my young mind, being able to drink a lot was as important a part of college life as being able to write a good paper. So I put in a lot of effort – to drinking – until I was able to knock back pints with the best of my new classmates. 

This kind of blind obligation to binge drink is exactly the kind of potentially dangerous boozing that’s led to a surge of new warnings from health experts. According to a report released this week by the World Health Organization (WHO), fully 16% of drinkers worldwide engage in heavy episodic (or binge) drinking – the most harmful form. 

WHO is urging governments to take aggressive steps to address the problem by raising taxes on alcohol sales, raising minimum drinking ages, regulating sales and so on. But if regulations alone were enough to reduce binge drinking, then countries with stricter rules would have better drinking habits. Except that isn’t always the case. 

As Western countries go, the United States is relatively puritanical about boozing – the legal drinking age is 21, liquor taxes are high, sales are regulated and public drinking is a no-no in most places. Yet binge drinking is a popular sport in the US, even among teenagers. 

The WHO report says 24.5% of American drinkers engage in bouts of heavy episodic drinking. Despite early pub closing times and high taxes on alcohol sales, Britain’s binge drinking rate is even worse, at 33.4%. In Ireland, where the laws are even stricter than in the UK, I’m embarrassed to say that a whopping 48.2% of drinkers binge. 

Want to curb binge drinking? End the focus on laws and look at culture

newsweek:

The summer before I went to university in Dublin, I was in a state of high anxiety – not about the prospect of leaving home or the coming course work so much as my ability to drink alcohol in any quantity.

To my young mind, being able to drink a lot was as important a part of college life as being able to write a good paper. So I put in a lot of effort – to drinking – until I was able to knock back pints with the best of my new classmates.

This kind of blind obligation to binge drink is exactly the kind of potentially dangerous boozing that’s led to a surge of new warnings from health experts. According to a report released this week by the World Health Organization (WHO), fully 16% of drinkers worldwide engage in heavy episodic (or binge) drinking – the most harmful form.

WHO is urging governments to take aggressive steps to address the problem by raising taxes on alcohol sales, raising minimum drinking ages, regulating sales and so on. But if regulations alone were enough to reduce binge drinking, then countries with stricter rules would have better drinking habits. Except that isn’t always the case.

As Western countries go, the United States is relatively puritanical about boozing – the legal drinking age is 21, liquor taxes are high, sales are regulated and public drinking is a no-no in most places. Yet binge drinking is a popular sport in the US, even among teenagers.

The WHO report says 24.5% of American drinkers engage in bouts of heavy episodic drinking. Despite early pub closing times and high taxes on alcohol sales, Britain’s binge drinking rate is even worse, at 33.4%. In Ireland, where the laws are even stricter than in the UK, I’m embarrassed to say that a whopping 48.2% of drinkers binge.

Want to curb binge drinking? End the focus on laws and look at culture